Prizes

The Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand is pleased to call for nominations for three prizes for theses and dissertations in economic history.

The S.J. Butlin Prize for the best PhD or Masters thesis in Australian and New Zealand economic history.

This prize honours the contribution of the late Professor Sydney James Butlin (1910-1977) to economic history.  It consists of A$750 and publication of a digest or a chapter of the winning thesis in the Australian Economic History Review, subject to the normal editorial revision by the journal editors. The summaries of the runners up will also be published in the Australian Economic History Review, subject to the normal editorial revision by the journal editors.

The prize shall be awarded to the candidate submitting the best thesis in the general field of Australian and/or New Zealand economic history (including business history and other cognate fields of research), accepted by the examiners in the three years preceding the closing date, which met in full or in substantial part the requirements of a postgraduate degree (Masters by research or PhD). A thesis may be submitted for the prize once only.

Nominations must contain a CV of the author, a 3,000 word dissertation summary, a PDF copy of the thesis, and confirmation that the thesis meets the criteria for the prize.

This call applies to theses accepted during the calendar years 2014-2016.

The Asia-Pacific Prize in Economic History for the best PhD or Masters thesis in economic history in the Asia-Pacific Region, excluding Australia and New Zealand.

The aim of the prize is to reward outstanding postgraduate research work in economic history.  It consists of A$500 and publication of the 3,000 word summary of the winning thesis in the Australian Economic History Review, subject to the normal editorial revision by the journal editors. The summaries of the runners up will also be published in the Australian Economic History Review, subject to the normal editorial revision by the journal editors.

The prize shall be awarded to the candidate submitting the best thesis in the general field of the economic history (including business history and other cognate fields of research) of one or more countries in the Asia-Pacific region (except Australia and New Zealand), written in English, accepted by the examiners in the three years preceding the closing date, and meeting in full or in substantial part the requirements of a postgraduate degree (Masters by research or PhD). A thesis may be submitted for the prize once only.

Nominations must contain a CV of the author, a 3,000 word dissertation summary, a PDF copy of the thesis, and confirmation that the thesis meets the criteria for the prize.

This call applies to theses accepted during the calendar years 2014-2016.

The J.W. McCarty Prize for the best 4th-year honours or graduate sub-thesis in economic history.

The aim of the prize is to encourage undergraduate and graduate coursework students to undertake further postgraduate studies in economic history. The prize honours the contribution of the late Professor John William McCarty (1931-1998) to economic history. It consists of A$250 and publication of a digest or a chapter of the winning thesis in the Australian Economic History Review, subject to the normal editorial revision by the journal editors.

The prize will be awarded to the best best 4th-year honours or graduate sub-thesis in economic history, completed in the two years preceding the closing date at an Australian or New Zealand academic institution.

It is acknowledged that the thesis requirements in 4th-year honours and graduate programs vary considerably across academic institutions in Australia and New Zealand, and across their departments. It is also acknowledged that  some  subjects  allow  for  a  greater  degree  of  originality  than  others,  perhaps  because  of  the  local availability of primary sources or data. Therefore, theses will be considered on topics which span not only the field of economic history, but also that of the cognate disciplines of business history, economics, history of economic thought, industrial relations, demography, politics and business studies. Theses which are not based on primary sources and data, but which, for instance, explore new methodological approaches, will also be considered.

Nominations must contain a PDF copy of the sub-thesis and confirmation that the thesis meets the criteria for the prize. The criteria for nomination are that (a) the nominator is a supervisor of the nominee, (b) the thesis was written as part of a degree program at an academic institution in Australia or New Zealand, and (c) the relevant degree requirements must have been satisfied by the time of the nomination. A thesis may be submitted for the prize once only.

This call applies to theses accepted during the calendar years 2015 and 2016.

Closing Date for nominations for all three prizes is 28 February 2017.  

In all cases, the Society’s executive committee will select a panel of independent readers, who will rank the theses and make a recommendation to the executive committee.  Awards will only be made if theses of sufficient merit are received.

Nominations, and any queries, should be transmitted to the Secretary of the Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, Dr Jim McAloon, History Programme, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand jim.mcaloon@vuw.ac.nz

Australian Historical Association Prizes

In addition to numerous scholarships and bursaries for postgraduate students, various prizes and awards are presented biennially and annually, ranging from $650 to $10 000.

For more information, including eligibility and deadlines, please see the AHA website.

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